How to add image descriptions

Image descriptions, also called alternative text, are an easy way to make Twitter accessible to people with disabilities.

Describing what’s in your images benefits people who are blind, have low vision, use assistive technology, live in low-bandwidth areas, or want more context. Without descriptions, your readers won’t know what your images contain, or why they're important. This missing information prevents people from engaging with your Tweet.

You can add image descriptions in four steps.

Add image descriptions

 

1. After uploading an image to a Tweet, select the +ALT button on the image. (“ALT” is the abbreviation for alternative text, which is the technical name for image description.)

Screenshot of draft Tweet with the text “Morning espresso I must have.” With an uploaded image of a mug of espresso. The add image description button is located at the bottom of the image.

 

2. Enter a description of the image in the text box. The description for this image is: “A small white mug with a tiny loop handle, with a shot of deep brown espresso and a light brown crema on top. The mug sits on a small white saucer on a medium brown wooden table.” In the corner of the text box is the character count. We’ve used 178 characters of the 1,000 characters available.

Screenshot of image description screen that shows uploaded image of espresso in mug, and text box with image description. The heading is “Write alt text.”

 

3. Select Done. An ALT badge will appear in the corner of the image. The + symbol no longer appears on the badge now that the description has been added.

Screenshot of draft Tweet with the text “Morning espresso I must have.” With uploaded image of a mug of espresso. The ALT badge is located at the bottom of the image.

 

4. Select Tweet. The ALT badge appears on the image of the posted Tweet. When someone selects the ALT badge, the image description appears on screen from the bottom up.

Screenshot of the posted Tweet with the ALT badge on the image.
Screenshot of the posted Tweet with the image description appearing. “Image description” is the title, and a dismiss button comes after the description.

 

1. After uploading an image to a Tweet, select the +ALT button on the image. (“ALT” is the abbreviation for alternative text, which is the technical name for image description.)

Screenshot of draft Tweet with the text “Morning espresso I must have.” With an uploaded image of a mug of espresso. The add image description button is located at the bottom of the image.

 

2. Enter a description of the image in the text box. The description for this image is: “A small white mug with a tiny loop handle, with a shot of deep brown espresso and a light brown crema on top. The mug sits on a small white saucer on a medium brown wooden table.” In the corner of the screen is the character count. We’ve used 178 characters of the 1,000 characters available.

Screenshot of image description screen that shows uploaded image of espresso in mug, and text box with image description. The heading is “Write alt text.”

 

3. Select Done. An ALT badge will appear in the corner of the image. The + symbol no longer appears on the badge now that the description has been added.

Screenshot of draft Tweet with the text “Morning espresso I must have,” with uploaded image of a mug of espresso. The ALT badge is located at the bottom of the image.

 

4. Select Tweet. When someone selects the ALT badge, the image description appears on screen.

Screenshot of the posted Tweet with the ALT badge on the image.
Screenshot of the posted Tweet with the image description appearing. “Image description” is the title, and a dismiss button comes after the description.

 

1. After uploading an image to a Tweet, select Add description underneath the image.

Screenshot of draft Tweet with the text “Morning espresso I must have.” With an uploaded image of a mug of espresso.

 

2. Enter a description of the image in the text box. The description for this image is: "A small white mug with a tiny loop handle, with a shot of deep brown espresso and a light brown crema on top. The mug sits on a small white saucer on a medium brown wooden table." In the corner of the text box is the character count. We’ve used 178 characters of the 1,000 characters available.

Screenshot of image description dialog box that shows uploaded image of espresso in mug, and text box with image description. The dialog is set to the ALT tab. The image edit tab is grayed out.

 

3. Select Save. An ALT badge will appear in the corner of the image. (“ALT” is the abbreviation for alternative text, which is the technical name for image description.)

Screenshot of draft Tweet with the text “Morning espresso I must have.” With uploaded image of a mug of espresso. The truncated image description displays below the image.

 

4. Select Tweet. When someone selects the ALT badge, the image description appears on screen.

Screenshot of the posted Tweet with the image description dialog displayed above the ALT badge, on top of the image. “Image description” is the title, and a dismiss button comes after the description.
Add multiple images

 

If you add more than one image to your Tweet on iOS, the images will appear in a horizontal scroll. Select the +ALT badge on each image to add the image descriptions.

Screenshot of draft Tweet with the text “Morning espresso I must have.” With two uploaded images of a mug of espresso, and small white mug with orange and blue flowers on it, both sitting on a saucer. The add image description button is located at the bottom of the images.

 

After you've added your image descriptions, you'll see the ALT badge appear on the images that have a description. People who view your Tweet will be able to select the ALT badge on each image to read the image descriptions.

 

If you add more than one image to your Tweet on Android, the images will appear in a horizontal scroll. Select the +ALT badge on each image to add the image descriptions.

Screenshot of draft Tweet with the text “Morning espresso I must have.” With two uploaded images of a mug of espresso, and small white mug with orange and blue flowers on it, both sitting on a saucer. The add image description button is located at the bottom of the images.

 

After you've added your image descriptions, you'll see the ALT badge appear on the images that have a description. People who view your Tweet will be able to select the ALT badge on each image to read the image descriptions.

 

If you add more than one image to your Tweet, you'll see arrows at the top of the dialog that allow you to navigate to each image to add the descriptions.

Screenshot of image description dialog box that shows uploaded image of espresso in a mug on a saucer, and text box with image description. The dialog is set to the ALT tab. Previous and Next arrows appear next to the Save button.

 

Select Save. After you’ve added your image descriptions, you'll see the ALT badge appear on the images that have a description. A note below the images that says "2 image descriptions" also confirms how many image descriptions have been added.

Screenshot of draft Tweet with the text, “Morning espresso I must have.” With two uploaded images of a mug of espresso, and a small white mug with orange and blue flowers on it, both sitting on a saucer. ALT badges appear on each image.

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