Accessibility features of Twitter

In 2020, Twitter created a team dedicated to making the Twitter app accessible to people with disabilities. While the work to increase accessibility continues, below is a list of the accessibility features of Twitter. This list is updated quarterly and includes features that could be considered usability best practices.

What we've done

  • Image descriptions (alt text)
     
    • Available for still media and GIFs
    • Available to everyone, not just assistive technology
    • Image description reminder
    • ALT badge
  • Captions

  • High-contrast buttons
  • Left-aligned text
  • White background 
  • Reader - Twitter Blue feature
  • Accessible content labels
  • Accessibility hints for assistive technology
  • Settings

    • Web
    • High contrast mode
    • Reduce motion
    • Video autoplay on/off
    • Font size customization
    • Dark / Dim modes
    • Display color customization
    • iOS
    • Pronounce # as hashtag
    • Include username in Timeline option
    • Read shortened URLs option
    • Magic Tap action to compose Tweet
    • High contrast mode
    • Video autoplay on/off
    • Open links in Reader view
    • Font size customization
    • Dark / Dim modes
    • Media preview
    • Sound effects
    • Android
    • Pronounce # as hashtag
    • Reduce motion
    • Video autoplay on/off
    • Media preview
    • Dark / Dim modes
    • Sound effects
    • Font size customization
 

What Tweet authors can do

  • Write in sentence case (instead of all caps or all lowercase).
  • Write hashtags in camel case (ThisIsCamelCase. Thisisnot.)
  • Break up large blocks of text with line breaks.
  • Don't repeat the same emoji more than 2-3 times, and place them at the end of a sentence. 
  • Avoid using emoji in your display name.
  • Upload a caption file with videos to ensure high-quality, correct captions.
  • Avoid special characters. If posting ASCII art, post an image of the art and write an image description of it.

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